November 17, 2009


thedailywhat:

Yahoo! Answer of the Day: Ask a question, get an answer.
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thedailywhat:

Yahoo! Answer of the Day: Ask a question, get an answer.

[via.]

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SCIENCE

December 10, 2009


thedailywhat:

Space Photo of the Day: On Novermber 14, 1984, NASA astronaut Dale Gardner strapped on his Manned Maneuvering Unit, stepped off the Space Shuttle Discovery, and proceeded to float fifty meters away, untethered, through the vast emptiness of space, to retrieve a wayward satellite which needed to be hauled back to earth.
Like a space-boss.
[via.]

thedailywhat:

Space Photo of the Day: On Novermber 14, 1984, NASA astronaut Dale Gardner strapped on his Manned Maneuvering Unit, stepped off the Space Shuttle Discovery, and proceeded to float fifty meters away, untethered, through the vast emptiness of space, to retrieve a wayward satellite which needed to be hauled back to earth.

Like a space-boss.

[via.]

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my life science

fuckyeahspace:

Mathematics is the language of the universe, a language exquisitely explicit and inherently followed by all which we know to exist. We humans forget this often and find ourselves taken aback by revelations of the persistence of math in our reality. Take, for instance, the above picture. The northern pole of the ringed planet Saturn is ringed by a hexagonal weather pattern. Weather as we know it on Earth is linear, following the curvature of the planet and moving around in a never-ending journey from west to east. But that isn’t what’s happening here. It’s as if the winds are traveling in one direction and abruptly making a 120-degree turn every so often. We don’t know what can possibly cause this phenomenon, which was first observed in the 1980s. Weather patterns on Earth last for a few weeks before dying out and giving way to new ones, but Saturn’s hexagon—much like Jupiter’s red spot—are unique in their endurance as well as their appearance. This is perhaps a testament to the miniscule knowledge of science in the face of the vastly infinite, but more likely it’s an example of the need for more concentration on mathematical and scientific research and theorizing.

fuckyeahspace:

Mathematics is the language of the universe, a language exquisitely explicit and inherently followed by all which we know to exist. We humans forget this often and find ourselves taken aback by revelations of the persistence of math in our reality. Take, for instance, the above picture. The northern pole of the ringed planet Saturn is ringed by a hexagonal weather pattern. Weather as we know it on Earth is linear, following the curvature of the planet and moving around in a never-ending journey from west to east. But that isn’t what’s happening here. It’s as if the winds are traveling in one direction and abruptly making a 120-degree turn every so often. We don’t know what can possibly cause this phenomenon, which was first observed in the 1980s. Weather patterns on Earth last for a few weeks before dying out and giving way to new ones, but Saturn’s hexagon—much like Jupiter’s red spot—are unique in their endurance as well as their appearance. This is perhaps a testament to the miniscule knowledge of science in the face of the vastly infinite, but more likely it’s an example of the need for more concentration on mathematical and scientific research and theorizing.

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science maths

December 11, 2009


December 16, 2009


Whatever his strategy, the good teacher detects important affective cues from the student and responds differently because of them. For example, the teacher might leave subtle hints or clues for the student to discover, thereby preserving the learner’s sense of self-propelled discovery. Whether the subject matter involves deliberate emotional expression as is the case with music, or is a “non-emotional” topic such as science, the teacher that attends to a student’s interest, pleasure, and distress is perceived as more effective than the teacher that proceeds callously. The best teachers know that frustration usually precedes quitting, and know how to redirect or motivate the pupil at such times. They get to know their student, including how much distress that student can withstand before learning breaks down.

Rosalind Picard, Affective Computing

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science

symbiosis:Gel electrophoresis cookies!

symbiosis:Gel electrophoresis cookies!

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nerdin science

December 24, 2009


findout:findlilyhere:
Fishermen row a boat in the algae-filled Chaohu Lake in Hefei, Anhui province, China on June 19, 2009. China invested 51 billion yuan ($7.4 billion) towards the construction of 2,712 projects for the treatment of eight rivers and lakes in 2009, Xinhua News Agency reported. (REUTERS/Jianan Yu)
2009 in photos (part 1 of 3) - The Big Picture - Boston.com

findout:findlilyhere:

Fishermen row a boat in the algae-filled Chaohu Lake in Hefei, Anhui province, China on June 19, 2009. China invested 51 billion yuan ($7.4 billion) towards the construction of 2,712 projects for the treatment of eight rivers and lakes in 2009, Xinhua News Agency reported. (REUTERS/Jianan Yu)

2009 in photos (part 1 of 3) - The Big Picture - Boston.com

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science

December 25, 2009


“Plants are not static or silly,” said Monika Hilker of the Institute of Biology at the Free University of Berlin. “They respond to tactile cues, they recognize different wavelengths of light, they listen to chemical signals, they can even talk” through chemical signals. Touch, sight, hearing, speech. “These are sensory modalities and abilities we normally think of as only being in animals,” Dr. Hilker said.

Plants Want to Live, Too - NYTimes.com

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December 29, 2009


January 13, 2010


In recent years, critics say, deals between name-brand makers and generic makers have delayed the introduction of a range of generics including cancer drugs, antidepressants and prescription-strength antacids. The F.T.C. has estimated that such deals currently cost American consumers $3.5 billion a year.

“These are collusive, price-fixing deals,” said Representative Chris Van Hollen, Democrat of Maryland, who is one of those urging Congress to ban the arrangements. “It means the consumer pays a lot more for their pharmaceuticals.”

Opponents of the generic agreements — maligned as “pay for delay” deals — say they are standard industry practice and help prop up monopoly pricing.

Generics account for only about 22 percent of prescription drug spending in this country, although they represent nearly three-quarters of the prescriptions written, according to the research firm IMS Health. That means 78 percent of the nation’s drug bill goes toward the 25 percent of prescriptions written for name-brand medicines.

Deals to Restrain Generic Drugs Face a Ban - NYTimes.com

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